Tuesday, 27 November 2018

InSight Mission – NASA's InSight Mars Lander (Successful landing)

quote [ November 27, 2018
InSight Is Catching Rays on Mars
The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took this photo on the surface of Mars. ]

The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took this photo on the surface of Mars.

NASA's InSight has sent signals to Earth indicating that its solar panels are open and collecting sunlight on the Martian surface. NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter relayed the signals, which were received on Earth at about 5:30 p.m. PST (8:30 p.m. EST). Solar array deployment ensures the spacecraft can recharge its batteries each day. Odyssey also relayed a pair of images showing InSight's landing site.

"The InSight team can rest a little easier tonight now that we know the spacecraft solar arrays are deployed and recharging the batteries," said Tom Hoffman, InSight's project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, which leads the mission. "It's been a long day for the team. But tomorrow begins an exciting new chapter for InSight: surface operations and the beginning of the instrument deployment phase."

InSight's twin solar arrays are each 7 feet (2.2 meters) wide; when they're open, the entire lander is about the size of a big 1960s convertible. Mars has weaker sunlight than Earth because it's much farther away from the Sun. But the lander doesn't need much to operate: The panels provide 600 to 700 watts on a clear day, enough to power a household blender and plenty to keep its instruments conducting science on the Red Planet. Even when dust covers the panels — what is likely to be a common occurrence on Mars — they should be able to provide at least 200 to 300 watts.

The panels are modeled on those used with NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, though InSight’s are slightly larger in order to provide more power output and to increase their structural strength. These changes were necessary to support operations for one full Mars year (two Earth years).

In the coming days, the mission team will unstow InSight's robotic arm and use the attached camera to snap photos of the ground so that engineers can decide where to place the spacecraft's scientific instruments. It will take two to three months before those instruments are fully deployed and sending back data.

In the meantime, InSight will use its weather sensors and magnetometer to take readings from its landing site at Elysium Planitia — its new home on Mars.

About InSight

JPL manages InSight for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. InSight is part of NASA's Discovery Program, managed by the agency's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built the InSight spacecraft, including its cruise stage and lander, and supports spacecraft operations for the mission.

A number of European partners, including France's Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), are supporting the InSight mission. CNES and IPGP provided the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS) instrument, with significant contributions from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany, the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) in Switzerland, Imperial College and Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and JPL. DLR provided the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) instrument, with significant contributions from the Space Research Center (CBK) of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Astronika in Poland. Spain’s Centro de Astrobiología (CAB) supplied the wind sensors.

For more information about InSight, visit: https://mars.nasa.gov/insight/

News Media Contact

Andrew Good
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-2433
andrew.c.good@jpl.nasa.gov

Related images and videos
Visitors await news of InSight's landing during a viewing party at the California Science Center in Los Angeles, California on Nov. 26, 2018.
California Science Center Hosts a Launch Viewing Party
Bruce Banerdt talks to a member of the media on Nov. 26, 2018, in advance of InSight's landing on Mars.
Media Conduct Interviews for InSight's Landing
Employees and visitors at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory gather on Nov. 26, 2018, to watch InSight land on Mars.
Employees and Visitors Gather at JPL before InSight Landing
› more images
[SFW] [science & technology] [+4]
[by lilmookieesquire@8:30amGMT]

Comments

knumbknutz said @ 1:37pm GMT on 27th Nov
Wait - did the The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, take this photo on the surface of Mars?
lilmookieesquire said @ 4:47pm GMT on 27th Nov
Did you know that the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took that photo on the surface of Mars?
arrowhen said @ 4:58pm GMT on 27th Nov
Of course the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took that photo on the surface of Mars! Where else would the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander have taken it?
lilmookieesquire said[1] @ 8:07pm GMT on 27th Nov
Well in this case the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took that photo on the surface of Mars! However it might not have been the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took that photo on the surface of Mars. It could have been another camera or another planet. But in this case I am happy to assure you that it was indeed the Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took that photo on the surface of Mars

Edit: If you have any questions about the location of the camera let me know!
arrowhen said @ 10:28pm GMT on 27th Nov
Did someone say Thunderfury, Blessed Blade of the Windseeker?
Anonynonymous said @ 3:15pm GMT on 27th Nov
Ankylosaur, your internet privilege has been revoked.
cb361 said @ 7:06pm GMT on 27th Nov
I thought the internet was our punishment in the first place.

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